The Law Above Nations

At this time dissension and lawlessness have the upper hand in much of the world. But we members of the legal profession throughout the Americas happily are united in a community of interest in the development and improvement of the legal systems of our several countries.

The Trials of War Criminals

There exists between France and America an intellectual kinship closer than commonly is recognized either side of the Atlantic, outside of the legal profession. The American ideal of representative free government represents the convergence of two great streams of Eighteenth Century liberal thought. One stream flowed from France, from the advanced thinkers of its pre- revolutionary days.

Tribute to Mary Willard

On Wednesday afternoon, June 10, 1931, Jamestown attorney Robert Jackson was one of the speakers at the Jamestown Public Schools’ annual memorial exercises for former teachers and students. On this occasion, Jackson spoke in the Euclid Street School auditorium about his former high school teacher and important mentor Mary Rosina Willard, who had died earlier that year at age 74. Jackson’s speech, which was published in a local newspaper, also is contained in his papers in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., Box 32.

Problems of the Federal Tax Bar

The American Bar Association's Committee on Taxation wisely has called those lawyers engaged in tax practice to meet and consider their common problems. In addition to difficulties which vex the general profession, tax practice presents some of its own. Need for a clearing house for the exchange of views, and a voice to speak for the tax bar is so apparent that I hope you may perfect at least a preliminary organization and perhaps a section for the purpose.

Address to the New York Economic Club

Able men, though perhaps extreme, avow a purpose to end the experiment in judicial review by constitutional amendment. Many of those think the Court has traveled a course of self-destruction and resent Presidential interference. Abolition of the power of judicial review is their aim.

Democracy’s Race Against Time

There are particular reasons why I am grateful for this opportunity to speak tonight to the Young Democratic Club of New York and this gathering of well wishers. Other speakers have referred to the honor conferred upon me by nomination for the high office of Solicitor General of the Unites States. The Solicitor General is the chief advocate for public causes before the Supreme Court of the United States. The office is probably the only office every lawyer happy in the work of his profession covets.

Back to the American Way

This meeting with the nationally famous Commonwealth Club of California is the high spot of my trip across the continent. I have driven for the purpose of getting a more intimate view of the towns and various countrysides which make up the great nation whose cases before the Supreme Court are my responsibility, I have often said that everyone in official life should be compelled to spend every third week at home -- wherever that is -- so as to get the tonic of life as it really is, to relieve the political high blood pressure that always affects Washington, and which at about this season is apt to make its victims a little hysterical.

The Undeveloped Strength of American Democracy

In a world that is moving so fast, prophesy is dangerous, and it is too early to draw more than tentative and contingent inferences as to the future. But prudence requires us to consider the possibility that after this war our nation will find itself in a reordered and less friendly environment. Unless we are to adopt a policy of non-resistance and comfort ourselves with the theory that virtue is its own reward, we cannot ignore the possibility that some decisive test of military strength may be forced upon us.

The Law Is a Rule for Men to Live By

I believe it was Emerson who said that institutions are but the lengthened shadows of individuals. It is my purpose to speak of Mr. Justice Brandeis, the man under whose lengthen shadow we gather tonight.

Roosevelt Commemorative Ceremony Address

It is an honor and privilege to speak to the people of Czechoslovakia who desire to meet in respect for Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It is the anniversary of a sad day in the lives of all of us who were permitted to serve under him in his government. I could tell you, if I were more gifted, of his kindness toward us and his thoughtfulness or the men about him.