Address at New York University

It would occasion my deep gratitude at any time to be chosen, with Senator Wagner, for an award from this class for meritorious service. But there are reasons why just at this time it is a cause of unusual satisfaction. A storm of violence and poison is sweeping over the world. The thoughts of men are turned to feats of strength and new achievements in destruction.

The Undeveloped Strength of American Democracy

In a world that is moving so fast, prophesy is dangerous, and it is too early to draw more than tentative and contingent inferences as to the future. But prudence requires us to consider the possibility that after this war our nation will find itself in a reordered and less friendly environment. Unless we are to adopt a policy of non-resistance and comfort ourselves with the theory that virtue is its own reward, we cannot ignore the possibility that some decisive test of military strength may be forced upon us.

A Program for Internal Defense of the United States

This course of the war in Europe has raised many new and unpleasant problems for each of us. Among them is the attention which must be given to the so-called "fifth column." This is a problem which is of peculiar interest to lawyers, for back of the rather lurid phrase are real questions as to the continued validity of the lawyers' concepts of a government of limited powers and as to their philosophy of the rights of individuals.

Address before Federal-State Conference on Law Enforcement Problems

The country is looking to all of us as responsible public officials to handle to problems of federal and state law enforcement in connection with the national defense in an efficient and orderly manner. It looks to the state and federal governments to work together in cooperation, and while it is impossible to eliminate reasonable disagreements of matters or detail, the grave responsibility which we share makes it certain that we will at least approach our problems in a spirit of mutual confidence.

The Department of Justice and the Cities

I was very grateful to hear the suggestion that there is a place for ex Attorneys general to go. I do not gather the impression that I would be so welcome in the St. Louis from some of the editorials that I have read in the St. Louis papers. I am glad to be reassured.

Government Counsel and Their Opportunity

Almost exactly six years ago I arrived in Washington to become a General Counsel for the Bureau of Internal Revenue. Promising myself and my clients that it was for a year only, a good deal bewildered at the size and complexity of the government machine, I joined the ranks of government counsel.

Democracy Under Fire

The American people are a practical lot. I think they are more entertained than influenced by the high blood pressure of politicians, and they do not take seriously either their campaign professions of perfection or their prophesies of disaster.

Our Government Is Prepared Against the Fifth Column

This nation is well equipped to combat sabotage, espionage, Fifth Column activities, and other matters related to law enforcement. Long before this country became alive to the dangers of the Fifth Column, the President, forewarned by his experience in the World War, saw emergence of national defense as the nation's first problem. As long ago as September 6, 1939, he directed that all federal agencies dealing with civil defense during peace time be coordinated under the Department of Justice.

Address at the American United Program

Perhaps I may be pardoned for speaking tonight on the ground that I agreed before the election to come here and speak, whether we should win or lose. I agreed to do so because I believe that a sportsmanship which ungrudgingly accepts the decision of the majority is an essential part of our democratic system.

Sesquicentennial of the Supreme Court of the United States

The Federal Judiciary Act which became a law on September 24, 1789, provided for a Supreme Court to consist of a Chief Justice and five associate justices, thirteen district courts, and three circuit courts composed of two Supreme Court justices and a district judge. The act further fixed the jurisdiction of the inferior federal courts and provided for appellate jurisdiction from the state courts in certain cases presenting federal questions.