The Challenge of International Lawlessness

We lawyers would commit only a pardonable larceny if we should appropriate as an affirmation of the ideals of the legal profession a prayer from ancient liturgy:... As men experienced in the conduct of legal institutions which, among men, have largely displaced violence by adjudication, we should have some practical competence in measures to maintain justice among nations.

Franklin Roosevelt

No other event could bow so many human heads in a common sorrow and a sense of personal loss. Throughout the land, by countless humble firesides people feel less secure today because he is gone; for, while he walked with Kings, they knew that he never lost the common touch; that he was their friend and advocate; that while he lived there would be no forgotten man. Neither sea nor land stretched far enough to get out of range of his sympathy and understanding.

Serving the Administration of Criminal Justice

I am always glad to appear before any function of the American Bar Association because long before I went to Washington I was active in the Association and was honored by it. I was one of the last chairmen of the conference of Bar Association Delegates which evolved into the House of Delegates, and the work of this Association has always been of interest to me. I think every man owes his best efforts to his profession.

Our American Legal Philosophy

I am happy to share the hospitality of this occasion- not as a guest, but more nearly as a returned prodigal. When, over a quarter of a century ago, I became a member of this association, it was the expectation of serving for life at the bar of this state. I was lured away for a time from that strict course, although I cannot saw that I did much to prevent my seduction.

Rule of Law Among Nations

On April 13, 1945, Justice Robert H. Jackson delivered a speech at the annual meeting of the American Society of International Law in Washington D.C. This speech was given the day after the death of President Roosevelt. In the speech, The Rule of Law Among Nations, Jackson urged that any war crimes trials following the war be genuine, informed by due process and the rule of law, and not pruned proceedings, contrived to reach a designed end.

The American Bar Center: A Testimony to Our Faith in the Rule of Law

In his address at the laying of the cornerstone of the new American Bar Center on November 2, Mr. Justice Jackson compared the Western ideal of the rule of law with the barbarian's reliance upon force, recently revived in the modern totalitarian states. The latter part of his address took the form of a legal creed that may well survive the building whose erection it marked.

Indifference to Our History

While the daily conduct of the war is not within the special competence of lawyers and judges, the factors that have slowed the democratic response to the challenge of war is something with which we may usefully concern ourselves.

The Nurnberg Trial

The University of Buffalo is passing the century mark. But what is more significant is that it attains a venerable age without losing the spirit of youth. It today dedicates its century-old accumulation of experience and academic tradition to the intellectual and ethical advancement of the youth of the coming century. I take pride in being admitted to its circle and asked to speak on this occasion.

The Supreme Court in the American System of Government

From the Foreword (written by E. Barrett Prettyman, Jr. & William Eldred Jackson) In March 1954 the Harvard Graduate School of Public Administration invited Mr. Justice Jackson to become the Godkin Lecturer for the academic year 1954-1955. The Justice accepted and chose as his topic for the three lectures, "The Supreme Court in the American System of Government." February of 1955 was tentatively set as the date for delivery. The Justice began outlining his subject and formulating his ideas soon after he accepted the invitation, and by the end of summer, 1954, he had completed six drafts of the first lecture and two of the second and third. He then reorganized the whole and wrote one more draft of the first two lectures and two partial redrafts of the third. Mr. Justice Jackson died suddenly on October 9, 1954. The Justice had intended to write several more drafts before February. Nevertheless, in view of the substantially completed form of the work, the decision was made to publish what he had already written. Except for technical corrections which the Justice himself would have made before delivery, the lectures remain in the form of the latest drafts to come from his hand. The Godkin Lectures on the Essentials of Free Government and the Duties of the Citizen were established at Harvard University in memory of Edwin Lawrence Godkin (1831-1902).

The Besieged Strongholds of the Mind

When the times cry for action rather than words, an international discussion meeting such as this can justified only by the assumption that the deeds of men are the products of their thoughts. It is idle to deny that by and large the deeds of the United Nations, except in defense of actual homelands in Russia and England, have been on a disappointing level of accomplishment.