Society and the Graduate

Commencement season is traditionally a time for casting up accounts between society and the graduate. This year some unusual items throw the account out of its normal balance. For many years American youth at this high moment of life took its place in a society that was regarded as collectively secure under national institutions that were sage from external attack.

Address at St. Lawrence University

The enemies with whom hostilities so recently ceased were among the most literate, scientific and artistic peoples of the world. No European people could better meet a general education test than the Germans, and no Orientals were more proficient in the Western arts and sciences that the Japanese. Barbarians no longer menace civilization, for modern war is a complicated enterprise that only a generally educated nation can manage. Hence the paradox that a people is to be feared in direct proportion to its education.

The America We’re Fighting For

How can American determine what its domestic goals after the war shall be? And why should we bother about it now? It is already plain that the Government will be pressed in favor of many plans by various planners. Important choices must be made. Intelligent decisions take time and preparation.

Liberian Anniversary Address

Many different reasons have led to the foundation of different new nations. Liberia is the only one that occurs to me as having been founded to ease a troubled national conscience. It is an outgrowth of the most deplorable chapter in American history-one which still leaves an ugly residue of misunderstanding between races and, to some extent, between sections or our country.

Swedish Contributions to Our Law

Three centuries make only a short pan in the long national life of Sweden, but they twice measure the entire national existence of the United States. our annals are concentrated in so few years that our interest in particular events sometimes appears extravagant to older peoples with longer histories.

A Country Lawyer at an International Court

One morning the telephone rang and we were asked about how to deliver a telegram to a man whom we happened to know but who had just moved into the neighborhood. Of course, we gave the information, but when they delivered the telegram he was surprised to find he had been identified so quickly and he said, "How did you ever know where to find me?" "Oh," said the telegraph man, "that was easy. We just called the Justice of the Peace:" (Laughter) So I claim that I am the first damn Yankee to be made a Virginia judge as quick as that.

An Address before the Canadian Bar Association

I value your invitation, not only as a personal honor, but as an expression of your esteem for the Court on which I sit and of your good will towards the legal profession in the United States. A sense a brotherhood, based on common tradition, always had animated the bars of our two countries.

Liberty Under Law

Words will hardly express my appreciation of this award. Its presentation evidences your fine generosity, whatever may be thought of the discrimination shown in your choice. You, and even I, must have reservations as to whether I deserve a place on the roll with the two extraordinary advocates on whom you have previously bestowed it. But I let no scruples stand in the way of eager and grateful acceptance.

American Courts

Over the next half century I cannot foresee, of course, the kind of world that will surround us at our work. We know that courts do not function well in an atmosphere of pressure and tumult and passion. Some people are voicing fears, or hopes, tat the post-war world will move sharply to the right; and others thing, to the left.

Youth Faces “The New Order”

On Monday morning, February 23, 1942, Justice Robert H. Jackson delivered the following speech in Buffalo, New York, at the University of Buffalo’s (UB’s)  2nd annual midyear convocation (commencement). The ceremony was held in UB’s Edmund Hayes Hall before almost 1,000 persons, including sixty-five degree recipients. Justice Jackson gave this speech half way through his first year as a Supreme Court justice and just twelve weeks after Japan's devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. He spoke to his Buffalo audience of Americans’ failure to grasp the drift of the world and the threat of Nazism, of the massive military struggle underway worldwide, and of the need for the U.S. to take the offensive in seeking to win a peace and a new world order based on reason, justice and personal freedom.