Decline of Stare Decisis is Due to Volume of Opinions

The Institute is recognition that the practicing lawyer as well as the legislator and the judge, share responsibility for the state of the law. In fact, our system of public justice presupposes the private law office. We speak of people's going to court. But first they go to a law office.

Nuremberg in Retrospect: Legal Answer to International Lawlessness

This is an authoritative account of the legal bases of the trials of the major Nazi war criminals before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg written by American Chief Prosecutor. Taken from an address delivered before the Canadian Bar Association meeting at Banff, Alberta, on September 1, Justice Jackson reviews in detail the legal foundations on which the trial rested and explains how the procedure used was determined.

The Churchman Address

The most fundamental certainty about the post-war world is in some ways the most discouraging one- it will be inhabited by people, mostly by the same people who populate it now. It is their suspicions and fears and ancient hatreds and conflicts in ambition and economic interest that have wrecked previous pans of world organization.

Law and Lawgivers

The dedication, on Palm Sunday, of two clerestory windows located in the east wall of the North Transept completed the trilogy representing the three human enterprises to which the Bible gives major recognition: medicine, law, and education. The new windows, law and education, were designed and executed in the studio of Wilbur H. Bumham of Boston and were given by Mrs. Benjamin DeWitt Riegel of New York in memory of her father and her husband, respectively.

Tribute To Country Lawyers

Judge Powell's book reminds us who come from rural backgrounds that our way of life was much the same all over America. Judge Powell and I are a generation apart, but country living changed little between his youth and mine. Its real transformation came with the automobile, the gasoline engine, the telephone, radio, electric power, and mechanization, all of which were unavailable on the farm when I was born.

Training the Trial Lawyer: A Neglected Area of Legal Education

That a Justice of the United States Supreme Court should help Stanford Law School dedicate its new home is only to observe that comity which one educational institution owes to another. There is more similarity between the two than you may have thought.

Full Faith and Credit

A namesake lecture in memory of Mr. Justice Cardozo is an undertaking of more than ordinary challenge to a Justice of a succeeding generation. Even choice of a fitting subject has difficulties. One related to the work of the Court on which he and I both have served might seem appropriate. But Judge Cardozo's most significant contributions to the law are not to be found in the reports of the Supreme Court. He was preeminently a devotee of the common law, while the Supreme Court has never been distinguished as a source of common law and during his time renounced independence of judgment as to what the common law is or should be in the class of cases that most often invoked it.(n2) Its preoccupation with constitutional law and statutory construction caused him some discontent which was not always concealed. He once said to me, "If you have a chance to go on the New York Court of Appeals, by all means do so. It is a great common law court, its problems are lawyers' problems. But the Supreme Court is occupied chiefly with statutory construction-which no man can make interesting-and with politics." Politics, I hasten to say, was used in the sense of policy, not of partisanship, and had no derogatory implications.

Wartime Security and Liberty Under Law

To initiate this series of namesake lecturers is an honor and its association with the memory of James McConnack Mitchell imposes a responsibility. Here in Western New York, when I was admitted to its bar.

The Challenge of International Lawlessness

We lawyers would commit only a pardonable larceny if we should appropriate as an affirmation of the ideals of the legal profession a prayer from ancient liturgy:... As men experienced in the conduct of legal institutions which, among men, have largely displaced violence by adjudication, we should have some practical competence in measures to maintain justice among nations.

Franklin Roosevelt

No other event could bow so many human heads in a common sorrow and a sense of personal loss. Throughout the land, by countless humble firesides people feel less secure today because he is gone; for, while he walked with Kings, they knew that he never lost the common touch; that he was their friend and advocate; that while he lived there would be no forgotten man. Neither sea nor land stretched far enough to get out of range of his sympathy and understanding.