An Address before the Canadian Bar Association

I value your invitation, not only as a personal honor, but as an expression of your esteem for the Court on which I sit and of your good will towards the legal profession in the United States. A sense a brotherhood, based on common tradition, always had animated the bars of our two countries.

The Significance of the Nuremberg Trials to the Armed Forces

The armed services are naturally concerned as to what we were driving at at Nuremberg, and as to the principle on which the leaders of the German armed services were called upon to pay a penalty for their acts. Military men throughout the world wanted to know what it was that brought the German military men to that somewhat unhappy position. I propose to face that problem very frankly today and to discuss the effect of this trial on the profession of arms.

Nuremberg in Retrospect: Legal Answer to International Lawlessness

This is an authoritative account of the legal bases of the trials of the major Nazi war criminals before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg written by American Chief Prosecutor. Taken from an address delivered before the Canadian Bar Association meeting at Banff, Alberta, on September 1, Justice Jackson reviews in detail the legal foundations on which the trial rested and explains how the procedure used was determined.

The Bar and the New Deal

The New Deal, as it affects the future of the Bar and the Law Schools, goes beyond the policies of the President and is more than a party slogan or a change of governmental personnel. It is a change in the fundamental relation of the federal government toward the governed, which has come so quickly that we have not recognized its significance.

Labor and the Law

When we met here twenty years ago, a dark era in labor's legal history had begun. The Supreme Court had recently held that the State of New York had no power to limit hours of labor in bakeries to 10 hours a day or 60 hours a week. For years that philosophy blighted efforts at reasonable hours in industry and retarded labor in getting its fair share of the leisure that mass production makes possible.

Social Justice Under Our Constitution

Humility best becomes a New Dealer in the presence of this group which knows Catholic social teaching. In most companies we may claim some leadership; here, in truth, we can claim only to have followed- and at a considerable distance behind- in trying to correct social evils which have long ago roused the anxiety of great leaders of the Church.

Government Counsel and Their Opportunity

Almost exactly six years ago I arrived in Washington to become a General Counsel for the Bureau of Internal Revenue. Promising myself and my clients that it was for a year only, a good deal bewildered at the size and complexity of the government machine, I joined the ranks of government counsel.

Democracy Under Fire

The American people are a practical lot. I think they are more entertained than influenced by the high blood pressure of politicians, and they do not take seriously either their campaign professions of perfection or their prophesies of disaster.

American Courts

Over the next half century I cannot foresee, of course, the kind of world that will surround us at our work. We know that courts do not function well in an atmosphere of pressure and tumult and passion. Some people are voicing fears, or hopes, tat the post-war world will move sharply to the right; and others thing, to the left.

Nuremberg Trial of the Major Nazi Leaders

I gladly accepted the invitation to talk informally about the Nurnberg trial of the major Nazi leaders because it was supremely interesting and important work of my life and an experience that would be unique in the life of any lawyer. The proceeding itself was invested with a certain melancholy grandeur both from its nature and from the character of the parties.