Your Business and Your Government

I am glad to discuss the relations of business and government before business men of Rochester because the experience of no city better illustrates what I want to talk about. There is no better illustration of the kind of business which this nation ought to foster than the kind of business you have fostered here. And there is no better illustration of the kind of business that is a menace to the United States than the kind of business which you do not encourage in Rochester.

Briefless Barristers and Lawyerless Clients

No greater misfortune can befall us than to have our leading lawyers become so preoccupied with individual practice that they fail to recognize difficulties gathering for the whole profession. Something like this has happened to the medical profession and may well be happening to lawyers.

Business and Government Have Worked Together

I once knew a smart lawyer who always took his well-to-do clients to court dressed up in their old clothes. He thought that got sympathy from the jury. I recognize the same tactics in some of the smart lawyer-candidates who are trying to dress up their political contributors in old clothes to get the sympathy of the voters this fall.

Indifference to Our History

While the daily conduct of the war is not within the special competence of lawyers and judges, the factors that have slowed the democratic response to the challenge of war is something with which we may usefully concern ourselves.

Worst Crime of All

For the first time in history four of the world's dominant nations have recognized the principle that to plot of launch a war of aggression is a crime for which individuals may be convicted and punished. This is, perhaps, the most significant feature of the agreement signed in London on August 3, 1945, for their respective Governments by Lord Jowitt, the Lord Chancellot of England; by M. Robert Falco, a judge of the Cour de Cassation, the highest court of France; by Maj. Gen. L. T. Nikitchenko, Vice President of the Supreme Court of the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics, and by me on behalf of the United States.

Address at the United Jewish Appeal

The Nurnberg trial laid bare to the world's view the basic evils that afflict our time. Unhappily, it did not end these evils. The Nurnberg lesson has been written. But has it been learned? Americans have expressed great concern as to whether the German people have learned its lessons.  But I am even more concerned about whether the American people have learned its lessons.

Independence Day Address

For nearly two years now many of us have been bewildered by the headlong course of events in Europe and not a few of us have been confused as to the course of wisdom at home. We have seen a nation which twenty years ago had been vanquished, rise up with a ferocity seldom seen in the history of mankind. We have seen vaunted armies smashed as if they were so much paper. We have seen Europe overrun and England placed in grave danger. We have seen the dictator idea spread in the world. At first its two principal proponents, communism and fascism, appeared to be mortal enemies.

Changes in Treasury Tax Policy

Among the most controversial and vital problems of the coming years are those relating to taxation. Lawyers will further impair their already declining leadership if they fail to bring disinterested and intelligent influence to bear upon the economic and legal questions involved.

Address before the New York State Bar Association

It is a comfort to speak again before my own Bar Association which has always been very tolerant of my heresies. I will test its patience again. Bar Association after-dinner speeches often voice the high and solemn esteem in which we hold ourselves. It was probably after a Bar dinner that the witty bard whose name our toastmester honors wrote:

Little Americanism

Joe Kennedy remarked the other day that the trouble with this country is that it has too many persons who are specialists in other people's business. Maybe he meant editors -- maybe lawyers. We have this at least in common, that we both take great liberty with the affairs of the public. And I am indebted to the press for so many suggestions about my work that I must begin payment by returning a few hints about yours.