Business Confidence and Government Policy

I want to talk about one thing only tonight and to talk of that in the plain terms the subject calls for. I am going to speak of the responsibilities of the government, in its relations with business, for the general well-being of the country. We hear much of the willingness of business to cooperate with government. We hear also of the desire of business that the government take steps to promote business confidence.

Philosophy of Big Busines

As students of political science we must try to understand the philosophy of big business. Unfortunately, no acknowledged business leader has formulated its doctrine or been its spokesman in the sense that Marx spoke for socialism, Lenin for communism and Jefferson or Roosevelt for democracy.

Address at the Jackson Day Dinner

I feel really needed here tonight- to defend the memory of Andrew Jackson as a man of the people. With these $50 and $100 dinners he is in danger of getting the name of being our most expensive Democrat. It shows what a marvelous politician he was when his name can be used to raise campaign funds a century after he lost all power to appoint anybody to anything.

Address before the New York State Bar Association

It is a comfort to speak again before my own Bar Association which has always been very tolerant of my heresies. I will test its patience again. Bar Association after-dinner speeches often voice the high and solemn esteem in which we hold ourselves. It was probably after a Bar dinner that the witty bard whose name our toastmester honors wrote:

Reorganization of Federal Judiciary

When a situation exists int he Supreme Court which the President feels he cannot continue to ignore it is to the Congress that he may properly bring the problem. The responsibility upon Congress for seeing that the American people have a workable, harmonious, and cooperative judicial system is so usually overlooked by those engaged in building up the tradition of judicial supremacy that the burden of constitutional responsibility on Congress deserves examination.

Address to the New York Economic Club

Able men, though perhaps extreme, avow a purpose to end the experiment in judicial review by constitutional amendment. Many of those think the Court has traveled a course of self-destruction and resent Presidential interference. Abolition of the power of judicial review is their aim.

The Struggle Against Monopoly

Few items of unfinished business present a challenge to this country so insistent as the settlement of an attitude toward the increasing concentration of business control. After 47 years of experience with the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Clayton Act, the Federal Trade Commission Act, the National Recovery Act and the Robinson-Patman Act, Senator Wagner commented that this experience has produced no coherent system of industrial control, and said: "Half of the laws enacted by Congress represent one school of thought, the other half the other. No one can state authoritatively what our national policy is."

Children of the Rich and Children of the Poor

For years we have heard easy lip service "in principle" to the commonplace that it is bad for America, economically as well as socially, to have child labor, sweated labor, low standards of living, inhumane and unhealthy working conditions.

Foundations of Our Unrest

As we look about at the society we are to serve, one of its significant intellectual characteristics is an inability to give sustained public attention to any problem. We view our government as from a train window. We would be incapable today of getting substantial public following of the entire proceedings of a constitutional convention and we could never get a modern serial on government like the "Federalist" widely read.

Labor and the Law

When we met here twenty years ago, a dark era in labor's legal history had begun. The Supreme Court had recently held that the State of New York had no power to limit hours of labor in bakeries to 10 hours a day or 60 hours a week. For years that philosophy blighted efforts at reasonable hours in industry and retarded labor in getting its fair share of the leisure that mass production makes possible.