Opening Statement before the International Military Tribunal

On November 21, 1945, in the Palace of Justice at Nuremberg, Germany, Justice Robert H. Jackson, Chief of Counsel for the United States, made his opening statement to the International Military Tribunal.

The Supreme Court in the American System of Government

From the Foreword (written by E. Barrett Prettyman, Jr. & William Eldred Jackson) In March 1954 the Harvard Graduate School of Public Administration invited Mr. Justice Jackson to become the Godkin Lecturer for the academic year 1954-1955. The Justice accepted and chose as his topic for the three lectures, "The Supreme Court in the American System of Government." February of 1955 was tentatively set as the date for delivery. The Justice began outlining his subject and formulating his ideas soon after he accepted the invitation, and by the end of summer, 1954, he had completed six drafts of the first lecture and two of the second and third. He then reorganized the whole and wrote one more draft of the first two lectures and two partial redrafts of the third. Mr. Justice Jackson died suddenly on October 9, 1954. The Justice had intended to write several more drafts before February. Nevertheless, in view of the substantially completed form of the work, the decision was made to publish what he had already written. Except for technical corrections which the Justice himself would have made before delivery, the lectures remain in the form of the latest drafts to come from his hand. The Godkin Lectures on the Essentials of Free Government and the Duties of the Citizen were established at Harvard University in memory of Edwin Lawrence Godkin (1831-1902).

The American Bar Center: A Testimony to Our Faith in the Rule of Law

In his address at the laying of the cornerstone of the new American Bar Center on November 2, Mr. Justice Jackson compared the Western ideal of the rule of law with the barbarian's reliance upon force, recently revived in the modern totalitarian states. The latter part of his address took the form of a legal creed that may well survive the building whose erection it marked.

Serving the Administration of Criminal Justice

I am always glad to appear before any function of the American Bar Association because long before I went to Washington I was active in the Association and was honored by it. I was one of the last chairmen of the conference of Bar Association Delegates which evolved into the House of Delegates, and the work of this Association has always been of interest to me. I think every man owes his best efforts to his profession.

Wartime Security and Liberty Under Law

To initiate this series of namesake lecturers is an honor and its association with the memory of James McConnack Mitchell imposes a responsibility. Here in Western New York, when I was admitted to its bar.

Training the Trial Lawyer: A Neglected Area of Legal Education

That a Justice of the United States Supreme Court should help Stanford Law School dedicate its new home is only to observe that comity which one educational institution owes to another. There is more similarity between the two than you may have thought.

Law and Lawgivers

The dedication, on Palm Sunday, of two clerestory windows located in the east wall of the North Transept completed the trilogy representing the three human enterprises to which the Bible gives major recognition: medicine, law, and education. The new windows, law and education, were designed and executed in the studio of Wilbur H. Bumham of Boston and were given by Mrs. Benjamin DeWitt Riegel of New York in memory of her father and her husband, respectively.

Nuremberg in Retrospect: Legal Answer to International Lawlessness

This is an authoritative account of the legal bases of the trials of the major Nazi war criminals before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg written by American Chief Prosecutor. Taken from an address delivered before the Canadian Bar Association meeting at Banff, Alberta, on September 1, Justice Jackson reviews in detail the legal foundations on which the trial rested and explains how the procedure used was determined.

Address at the United Jewish Appeal

The Nurnberg trial laid bare to the world's view the basic evils that afflict our time. Unhappily, it did not end these evils. The Nurnberg lesson has been written. But has it been learned? Americans have expressed great concern as to whether the German people have learned its lessons.  But I am even more concerned about whether the American people have learned its lessons.

Closing Address before the International Military Tribunal

An advocate can be confronted with few more formidable tasks than to select his closing arguments where there is great disparity between his appropriate time and his available material. In eight months -short time as state trials go - we have introduced evidence which embraces as vast and varied a panorama of events as has ever been compressed within the framework of a litigation. It is impossible in summation to do more than outline with bold strokes the vitals of this trial's mad and melancholy record, which will live as the historical text of the Twentieth Century's shame and depravity.