Address at New York University

It would occasion my deep gratitude at any time to be chosen, with Senator Wagner, for an award from this class for meritorious service. But there are reasons why just at this time it is a cause of unusual satisfaction. A storm of violence and poison is sweeping over the world. The thoughts of men are turned to feats of strength and new achievements in destruction.

The Law Above Nations

At this time dissension and lawlessness have the upper hand in much of the world. But we members of the legal profession throughout the Americas happily are united in a community of interest in the development and improvement of the legal systems of our several countries.

The Trials of War Criminals

There exists between France and America an intellectual kinship closer than commonly is recognized either side of the Atlantic, outside of the legal profession. The American ideal of representative free government represents the convergence of two great streams of Eighteenth Century liberal thought. One stream flowed from France, from the advanced thinkers of its pre- revolutionary days.

Tribute to Mary Willard

On Wednesday afternoon, June 10, 1931, Jamestown attorney Robert Jackson was one of the speakers at the Jamestown Public Schools’ annual memorial exercises for former teachers and students. On this occasion, Jackson spoke in the Euclid Street School auditorium about his former high school teacher and important mentor Mary Rosina Willard, who had died earlier that year at age 74. Jackson’s speech, which was published in a local newspaper, also is contained in his papers in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., Box 32.

The Lawyer; Leader or Mouthpiece?

I have come to regard many of the things about which we complain as symptoms of an underlying weakness in the position of the profession itself, and in its method of work, rather than as causes of weakness. If our associations, by and large, are inanimate, incoherent and unrepresentative, if it be true that our neighbors prefer to trust bankers rather than lawyers to settle their estates, if law makers are taking judicial functions away from lawyer-dominated courts and turning them over to lay tribunals, if misconduct by a few shysters can bring a whole profession into public contempt, should we not look deeper to see what keeps us from effective organization, what weakness makes us subject to invasion, why public opinion judges all lawyers by the worst instead of by the best?

Reorganization of Federal Judiciary

When a situation exists int he Supreme Court which the President feels he cannot continue to ignore it is to the Congress that he may properly bring the problem. The responsibility upon Congress for seeing that the American people have a workable, harmonious, and cooperative judicial system is so usually overlooked by those engaged in building up the tradition of judicial supremacy that the burden of constitutional responsibility on Congress deserves examination.

Call for a Liberal Bar

The history of progress in society is a story of struggle for better law. We do not achieve improvement merely by recording a vote of the people. Their action must be reduced from political principle to a legal rule or an institution. It has been one of the tasks of lawyers to translate the aspirations of our people into law, and into living institutions. In this their function has been vital to progress, and the call for their service is a continuing one.

Product of the Present Day Law School

A canny old lawyer friend of mine made a practice of trying to explain his most complex legal problems to some intelligent- and, of course, patient- layman. He said he wanted to test his expert judgments by getting the reactions of an untrained mind.

The Undeveloped Strength of American Democracy

In a world that is moving so fast, prophesy is dangerous, and it is too early to draw more than tentative and contingent inferences as to the future. But prudence requires us to consider the possibility that after this war our nation will find itself in a reordered and less friendly environment. Unless we are to adopt a policy of non-resistance and comfort ourselves with the theory that virtue is its own reward, we cannot ignore the possibility that some decisive test of military strength may be forced upon us.

The Law Is a Rule for Men to Live By

I believe it was Emerson who said that institutions are but the lengthened shadows of individuals. It is my purpose to speak of Mr. Justice Brandeis, the man under whose lengthen shadow we gather tonight.