Problems of the Federal Tax Bar

The American Bar Association's Committee on Taxation wisely has called those lawyers engaged in tax practice to meet and consider their common problems. In addition to difficulties which vex the general profession, tax practice presents some of its own. Need for a clearing house for the exchange of views, and a voice to speak for the tax bar is so apparent that I hope you may perfect at least a preliminary organization and perhaps a section for the purpose.

Why a College Education?

Perhaps you have heard about the College Executives who were discussing what they wanted to do after retirement age. One hoped to run a prison or school of correction, so the alumni would never come back to visit. Another chose to manage an orphan asylum so he would not be plagued with advice from parents.

Messages On The Launching Of The “Bill of Rights Review”

Every failure of civil rights is at bottom a reflection on the legal profession. The last census revealed approximately 160,00 lawyers in the United States, or one lawyer for about 760 of population. These lawyers reside in every community, large and small; they are in contact with every class of the people; and they take part in every individual and group struggle.

That Baby: Justice Jackson’s Writings About a Grandchild, and Vice Versa

As Justice Jackson's (Grampa's) oldest grandchild (born in March 1946), I was able to observe him from a perspective that most people did notófrom a crib, or from under the dining table, for example. Seriously, my younger brother Bob and I were fortunate to spend a good bit of time with him, and at his Hickory Hill home in McLean, Virginia, because my family lived nearby from 1949 until his death in October 1954. Of course, he was the chief inspiration for my legal career.

The Struggle for Judicial Supremacy: A Study of a Crisis in American Power Politics

In January 1941, Jackson, as Attorney General of the United States, published a best seller, The Struggle for Judicial Supremacy: A Study of a Crisis in American Power Politics (Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.). In the book, Jackson reviewed the history of the Supreme Court of the United States, the increase in its power through adjudications of the constitutionality of federal and state laws and, in response, President Franklin Roosevelt’s 1937 effort to resist judicial expansionism through “Court-packing” legislation.

The Bar and the New Deal

The New Deal, as it affects the future of the Bar and the Law Schools, goes beyond the policies of the President and is more than a party slogan or a change of governmental personnel. It is a change in the fundamental relation of the federal government toward the governed, which has come so quickly that we have not recognized its significance.

Farmers and Anti-Trust Law

The antitrust law in an American invention. Those interests which try to discredit all distasteful legislation by labeling it as "an alien influence" cannot so characterize our laws against monopoly. If any trace of foreign influence can be found it is abhorrence of monopoly and a policy to restrain it.

Judicial Career of Chief Justice Hughes

The afterglow of a distinguished career is not a satisfactory light in which to subject it to critical judgment. Only the perspective that comes with time enables a severance of the work from the worker, and supplies the criteria to appraise the value and endurance of one's effort.

The Genial Justice: Robert H. Jackson

Robert H. Jackson was a distinguished Supreme Court justice, but he also possessed an irreverent wit and contagious charm. These human and personal attributes inspired fond and enduring respect among those who had the good fortune to know him or to work for him as a law clerk.

The Case Against the Nazi War Criminals

From the book jacket: This volume contains several of the most significant documents of our era. They are: Justice Robert H. Jackson's opening statement for the United States a the trial of the Nazi war criminals at Nurnberg; the complete text of the indictment of the Nazi criminals; and the text of the four-power agreement upon which the trials are based. These documents are introduced by an explanatory analysis by Gordon Dean of United States counsel.