The Bar and the New Deal

The New Deal, as it affects the future of the Bar and the Law Schools, goes beyond the policies of the President and is more than a party slogan or a change of governmental personnel. It is a change in the fundamental relation of the federal government toward the governed, which has come so quickly that we have not recognized its significance.

Farmers and Anti-Trust Law

The antitrust law in an American invention. Those interests which try to discredit all distasteful legislation by labeling it as "an alien influence" cannot so characterize our laws against monopoly. If any trace of foreign influence can be found it is abhorrence of monopoly and a policy to restrain it.

Judicial Career of Chief Justice Hughes

The afterglow of a distinguished career is not a satisfactory light in which to subject it to critical judgment. Only the perspective that comes with time enables a severance of the work from the worker, and supplies the criteria to appraise the value and endurance of one's effort.

The Genial Justice: Robert H. Jackson

Robert H. Jackson was a distinguished Supreme Court justice, but he also possessed an irreverent wit and contagious charm. These human and personal attributes inspired fond and enduring respect among those who had the good fortune to know him or to work for him as a law clerk.

The Case Against the Nazi War Criminals

From the book jacket: This volume contains several of the most significant documents of our era. They are: Justice Robert H. Jackson's opening statement for the United States a the trial of the Nazi war criminals at Nurnberg; the complete text of the indictment of the Nazi criminals; and the text of the four-power agreement upon which the trials are based. These documents are introduced by an explanatory analysis by Gordon Dean of United States counsel.

Big Corporation’s Rule

It is apparent, therefore, that the proposal of the President in addition to producing additional revenue involves a redistribution of the corporation-tax burden by which 95 percent of all corporations obtain some tax relief, and about 5 percent, consisting of the largest corporations, would sustain an additional burden. Such a shifting of the burden would produce desirable results from many standpoints.

Philosophy of Big Busines

As students of political science we must try to understand the philosophy of big business. Unfortunately, no acknowledged business leader has formulated its doctrine or been its spokesman in the sense that Marx spoke for socialism, Lenin for communism and Jefferson or Roosevelt for democracy.

Full Faith and Credit

A namesake lecture in memory of Mr. Justice Cardozo is an undertaking of more than ordinary challenge to a Justice of a succeeding generation. Even choice of a fitting subject has difficulties. One related to the work of the Court on which he and I both have served might seem appropriate. But Judge Cardozo's most significant contributions to the law are not to be found in the reports of the Supreme Court. He was preeminently a devotee of the common law, while the Supreme Court has never been distinguished as a source of common law and during his time renounced independence of judgment as to what the common law is or should be in the class of cases that most often invoked it.(n2) Its preoccupation with constitutional law and statutory construction caused him some discontent which was not always concealed. He once said to me, "If you have a chance to go on the New York Court of Appeals, by all means do so. It is a great common law court, its problems are lawyers' problems. But the Supreme Court is occupied chiefly with statutory construction-which no man can make interesting-and with politics." Politics, I hasten to say, was used in the sense of policy, not of partisanship, and had no derogatory implications.

The Twinkle in His Eyes

Robert H. Jackson will undoubtedly be remembered in history as a founder of International Law. I will always remember him as a kind, gentle man with twinkling eyes. I was fortunate enough to meet a personnel director on her way to lunch who was thinking about how she could find a capable secretary. She needed someone who would be available within a week to accompany the first contingent of Justice Jacksonís staff, who were leaving for England, to prepare cases against the major German War Criminals.

The Nürnberg Case: as presented by Robert H. Jackson

From the book jacket: Here are the high points of the unique war-criminals trials, from Jackson's preliminary Report to President Truman of June 7, 1945, in complete form, to the closing section of he final Report to the President of October 7, 1946. The Opening Statement and the Closing Speech for the United States are printed in their entirety, as is the speech delivered by Jackson expounding the theory of legality involved in accusing Nazi organizations of being criminal. In 1947, Jackson published The Nürnberg Case (Knopf), which includes his first report to President Truman (June 1945), the London Agreement, Jackson’s opening statement, his legal argument on the criminal charges against indicted Nazi organizations (February 1946), Jackson’s closing address at the trial (July 1946) and excerpts from four of his cross-examinations (of defendants Hermann Goering, Hjalmar Schacht and Albert Speer and defense witness Erhard Milch) during the trial.