The Future of the Bar

Many thoughtful men are asking whether the bar is like the Irishman's hunting dog whose "future was all in the past." In pioneer American society, three groups claimed to be "learned professions" and proved the claim by default. They were the preachers, the doctors and the lawyers.

People’s Business

Mr. Edward E. Loomis, who wrote on "Taxes and Labor" in the December FORUM, dislikes taxes- apparently all taxes. Emotionally, I am in sympathy with him. From childhood we hear about death and taxes as the twin evils all must face. Nearly all revolutions have been contributed to by a hatred of taxation.

Progress in Federal Judicial Administration

We have heard much discussion about the declining of prestige of the bar, and about the proper place of the lawyer in the leadership of his community, state, and nation. But there can be no denial that it is the duty of the lawyers to lead in affairs affecting the courts of the land. The lawyer is peculiarly qualified to judge their work and to deal out criticism where it is due- and to do it with fairness.

A Presidential Legal Opinion

Justice Jackson's essay, A Presidential Legal Opinion, reveals for the first time President Franklin Roosevelt's personal opinions, in FDR's own words, regarding the constitutionality of articles of the Lend Lease Act.

Trial Practice in Accident Litigation

Of the many criticisms which the lay world aims at the legal profession, the most justifiable is that great uncertainty exists both in the law which we apply and in the results which attend our procedure. None may deny that charge; we can differ only as to how much of the uncertainty is inherent and unavoidable and how much we contribute by our philosophy and practice.

Address before the New York State Bar Association

It is a comfort to speak again before my own Bar Association which has always been very tolerant of my heresies. I will test its patience again. Bar Association after-dinner speeches often voice the high and solemn esteem in which we hold ourselves. It was probably after a Bar dinner that the witty bard whose name our toastmester honors wrote:

Maryland at the Supreme Court Bar

So I shall ask you to bear with us while we indulge our lawyerly trait of discussing law suits. We shall prefer to discuss our own rather than to discuss those which some other men may have tried. In studying constitutional issues in the Supreme Court I became vaguely aware that Maryland has been one of the most frequent of its litigants and had participated in some of the most significant cases which have shaped our constitutional doctrine. I have taken this occasion to review the Supreme Court annals to see how well, by its record in litigation, Maryland has vindicated its designation as "The Free State".

A Tribute to Robert H. Jackson by his Nephew

In the courtroom or out of it, Robert Jackson was a remarkable man. This judgment, however, is not entirely objective since he was my uncle. From an early age, he was his own man. Although his father insisted that he become a doctor, he was determined instead to become a lawyer. When his father refused financial assistance, young Robert borrowed money from his uncle and headed for Albany Law School where he completed the course in a single year.