The Lawyer; Leader or Mouthpiece?

I have come to regard many of the things about which we complain as symptoms of an underlying weakness in the position of the profession itself, and in its method of work, rather than as causes of weakness. If our associations, by and large, are inanimate, incoherent and unrepresentative, if it be true that our neighbors prefer to trust bankers rather than lawyers to settle their estates, if law makers are taking judicial functions away from lawyer-dominated courts and turning them over to lay tribunals, if misconduct by a few shysters can bring a whole profession into public contempt, should we not look deeper to see what keeps us from effective organization, what weakness makes us subject to invasion, why public opinion judges all lawyers by the worst instead of by the best?

Problems of the Federal Tax Bar

The American Bar Association's Committee on Taxation wisely has called those lawyers engaged in tax practice to meet and consider their common problems. In addition to difficulties which vex the general profession, tax practice presents some of its own. Need for a clearing house for the exchange of views, and a voice to speak for the tax bar is so apparent that I hope you may perfect at least a preliminary organization and perhaps a section for the purpose.

Address at the Congressional Country Club

This kindly reception by fellow lawyers in the Federal Service is the more appreciated because so entirely unearned. Such generosity toward the awkwardness of the beginner and charity toward the blunders of the more advanced is a redeeming inward characteristic of our profession, which the layman judges chiefly by its more visible signs of quarrelsomeness and antagonism. None has experienced during professional life greater generosity from fellow members of the bar and none has greater need for the continued grant of their charity than I.

The Lawyer’s New Deal

The time has come for the financially hard pressed legal profession to call upon its Bar Associations to stop lending themselves to clients who want to embarrass or prevent the "New Deal" in government and to seek a "new deal" for lawyers themselves.

Address to Senior Law Students of Georgetown University

I am certainly glad to talk here and to be of such help as I may, if any, to a group of young men who are preparing to take places in the legal profession, a profession which I think offers more opportunity for pioneering and independent thought today than almost any profession to which you might seek admission.

The Bar and the New Deal

The New Deal, as it affects the future of the Bar and the Law Schools, goes beyond the policies of the President and is more than a party slogan or a change of governmental personnel. It is a change in the fundamental relation of the federal government toward the governed, which has come so quickly that we have not recognized its significance.

Address before the Beaver County Bar Association

In these times when each professional and business group seeks to learn where it is going, none surveys its future with more anxiety than does the bar. Our ancient profession has survived many social and economic overturns and will doubtless survive more, but the trend e of the profession is disturbing its more thoughtful members.

Equity in the Administration of Federal Taxes

Of the legal relations upon which the corporate individual clients must seek advice, none is more vexing than those created by the tax laws of local, state and national governments. Lawyers can no longer remain aloof from the tax problem as one that is trivial, nor can they abandon the problem as an accounting problem, nor can the corporation or family adviser turn it over as an independent and disconnected problem for the specialist. Taxation is not a separate problem but is interwoven with every problem or relationship that involves acquisition or disposition of property

The Liberty League and the Constitution

Under the sponsorship of the "American Liberty League", James M. Beck lately lectured the Bar, by radio and by pamphlet, on "The Duty of the Lawyer in the Present Crisis". His speech was an indiscriminating attack upon the legal advisers of this Administration, and the duty which he urged upon all lawyers was, "We must defeat the sappers and miners of the New Deal, who are insidiously undermining the very foundations of the Constitution".

Rich Get Richer

As the figures of tax collections have become available, it has become apparent that the present administration inherited in 1933 a tax structure that, in terms of making that burden proportionate to ability to pay, had become out of balance even by the standards adopted during the preceding administration....