Address before the Beaver County Bar Association

In these times when each professional and business group seeks to learn where it is going, none surveys its future with more anxiety than does the bar. Our ancient profession has survived many social and economic overturns and will doubtless survive more, but the trend e of the profession is disturbing its more thoughtful members.

Equity in the Administration of Federal Taxes

Of the legal relations upon which the corporate individual clients must seek advice, none is more vexing than those created by the tax laws of local, state and national governments. Lawyers can no longer remain aloof from the tax problem as one that is trivial, nor can they abandon the problem as an accounting problem, nor can the corporation or family adviser turn it over as an independent and disconnected problem for the specialist. Taxation is not a separate problem but is interwoven with every problem or relationship that involves acquisition or disposition of property

The Liberty League and the Constitution

Under the sponsorship of the "American Liberty League", James M. Beck lately lectured the Bar, by radio and by pamphlet, on "The Duty of the Lawyer in the Present Crisis". His speech was an indiscriminating attack upon the legal advisers of this Administration, and the duty which he urged upon all lawyers was, "We must defeat the sappers and miners of the New Deal, who are insidiously undermining the very foundations of the Constitution".

Rich Get Richer

As the figures of tax collections have become available, it has become apparent that the present administration inherited in 1933 a tax structure that, in terms of making that burden proportionate to ability to pay, had become out of balance even by the standards adopted during the preceding administration....

Address to the Daughters of the American Revolution

It is interesting to see so many uncompromising conservatives assembled in memory of a revolution and to see many who a year ago almost shuddered at the thought of a mere change of administration gathered here to commemorate the birth of Washington, who overthrew the established government by bloodshed to give the American of his day a "New Deal". It is one of those strange traits of human nature that very often those strongest for ancestral revolts are strongest against present ones, those more ardent for the first revolution are most cold to the latest one.

Delayed Justice in New York State

The task still ahead of us is one of interpretation of the data assembled and of devising remedies for the abuses uncovered. The research work was so specialized that the Bench or Bar generally could not join in it, but the task from now on is your task as much as ours and as soon as our report is made available for study, we invite the help and suggestions of all men.

Introductory Address to the Bureau of Internal Revenue Legal Office

In first the meeting the entire legal staff of what is said to be the largest law office in the world, I must make a confession and perhaps do penance. I have never before been in the Government service and have never specialized in the practice of law before its Executive of Legislative Departments. I confess I have had the conventional attitude among those who are rather far removed from the government service. It seemed to me that the government service was a place where all matters met with interminable delay without much effort to close them up; where the character of the service they received was of doubtful competency and indifferent character.  

Changes in Treasury Tax Policy

Among the most controversial and vital problems of the coming years are those relating to taxation. Lawyers will further impair their already declining leadership if they fail to bring disinterested and intelligent influence to bear upon the economic and legal questions involved.

The Lawyer; Leader or Mouthpiece?

I have come to regard many of the things about which we complain as symptoms of an underlying weakness in the position of the profession itself, and in its method of work, rather than as causes of weakness. If our associations, by and large, are inanimate, incoherent and unrepresentative, if it be true that our neighbors prefer to trust bankers rather than lawyers to settle their estates, if law makers are taking judicial functions away from lawyer-dominated courts and turning them over to lay tribunals, if misconduct by a few shysters can bring a whole profession into public contempt, should we not look deeper to see what keeps us from effective organization, what weakness makes us subject to invasion, why public opinion judges all lawyers by the worst instead of by the best?

Problems of the Federal Tax Bar

The American Bar Association's Committee on Taxation wisely has called those lawyers engaged in tax practice to meet and consider their common problems. In addition to difficulties which vex the general profession, tax practice presents some of its own. Need for a clearing house for the exchange of views, and a voice to speak for the tax bar is so apparent that I hope you may perfect at least a preliminary organization and perhaps a section for the purpose.