National University Commencement Address

Few Commencements offer opportunity to speak to graduates so mature in experience and in years as do those of National University. Your years of study here have not been a merely pleasing interlude between the age of compulsory education and the age of self-support. You, who have sacrificed leisure to study, who have paid your own way to remove shortcoming which you yourselves have recognized in preparation for life's work, know both the cost and the value of better training.

Is Our Constitutional Government in Danger?

The Constitution of the United States, as written by our forefathers and ratified by the people themselves, is not beyond the understanding of the average citizen. In simple language it sets up a skeleton government, sketches its powers and limitations in a few great clauses, and in ten short amendments declares those fundamental rights which make up our freedom. It does not use technical terms, and it is all contained in about 4.500 words. Such brevity proves that it is not a mere lawyer's document. I urge you to study it.

The Department of Justice and the Cities

I was very grateful to hear the suggestion that there is a place for ex Attorneys general to go. I do not gather the impression that I would be so welcome in the St. Louis from some of the editorials that I have read in the St. Louis papers. I am glad to be reassured.

Swedish Contributions to Our Law

Three centuries make only a short pan in the long national life of Sweden, but they twice measure the entire national existence of the United States. our annals are concentrated in so few years that our interest in particular events sometimes appears extravagant to older peoples with longer histories.

Lawyers Today: The Legal Profession in a World of Paradox

We are aware that lawyers exert an influence on the social and governmental policy of the United States that is disproportionate to their numbers. The same is true in varying degrees of the legal profession in other countries. Its function and interest everywhere are concerned with movement and policies that affect the fundamental legal structure on which the individual relies for security and free personality.

Youth Faces “The New Order”

On Monday morning, February 23, 1942, Justice Robert H. Jackson delivered the following speech in Buffalo, New York, at the University of Buffalo’s (UB’s)  2nd annual midyear convocation (commencement). The ceremony was held in UB’s Edmund Hayes Hall before almost 1,000 persons, including sixty-five degree recipients. Justice Jackson gave this speech half way through his first year as a Supreme Court justice and just twelve weeks after Japan's devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. He spoke to his Buffalo audience of Americans’ failure to grasp the drift of the world and the threat of Nazism, of the massive military struggle underway worldwide, and of the need for the U.S. to take the offensive in seeking to win a peace and a new world order based on reason, justice and personal freedom.

Address to Senior Law Students of Georgetown University

I am certainly glad to talk here and to be of such help as I may, if any, to a group of young men who are preparing to take places in the legal profession, a profession which I think offers more opportunity for pioneering and independent thought today than almost any profession to which you might seek admission.

Foundations of Our Unrest

As we look about at the society we are to serve, one of its significant intellectual characteristics is an inability to give sustained public attention to any problem. We view our government as from a train window. We would be incapable today of getting substantial public following of the entire proceedings of a constitutional convention and we could never get a modern serial on government like the "Federalist" widely read.

General Welfare and Industrial Prosperity

The most progressive communities of the United States are the ones that have the most delicate tasks of adjustment between old forms of government and new problems of social security and economic justice. Because the Illinois Municipal League is made up of representatives of the cities of one of the most progressive states of our Union, I have welcomed this opportunity to discuss with you some of the problems that vex all progressing administrations, whether federal, state, or city.