The Proposed Revision of Corporate Taxes

The honor and pleasure of speaking to the Young Democratic Club leads me to put aside the temptation to make the usual political speech and instead to present my personal views of President Roosevelt's proposed revision of the Federal tax on corporations. It is a living and important subject upon which there is much public confusion and not a little loose talking.

Business Confidence and Government Policy

I want to talk about one thing only tonight and to talk of that in the plain terms the subject calls for. I am going to speak of the responsibilities of the government, in its relations with business, for the general well-being of the country. We hear much of the willingness of business to cooperate with government. We hear also of the desire of business that the government take steps to promote business confidence.

Progress in Federal Judicial Administration

We have heard much discussion about the declining of prestige of the bar, and about the proper place of the lawyer in the leadership of his community, state, and nation. But there can be no denial that it is the duty of the lawyers to lead in affairs affecting the courts of the land. The lawyer is peculiarly qualified to judge their work and to deal out criticism where it is due- and to do it with fairness.

The Federal Prosecutor

It would probably be within the range of that exaggeration permitted in Washington to saw that assembled in this room is one of the most powerful peace-time forces known to our country. The prosecutor has more control over life, liberty, and reputation than any other person in America. His discretion is tremendous. He can have citizens investigated and, if he is that kind of person, he can have this done to the tune of public statements and veiled or unveiled intimations.

Commencement Address at Albany Law School

It was a generation ago when the Albany Law School charitably honored me with a diploma of graduation. The school was then housed in an ancient State Street building, reputed once to have been consecrated as a church. Its façade suggested a piety that was not fully sustained by the student body. It is a matter of pride to us, who will always remain in debt to the Albany Law School, that its intervening years have been marked by steadily improving facilities and advancing standards.

Full Faith and Credit

A namesake lecture in memory of Mr. Justice Cardozo is an undertaking of more than ordinary challenge to a Justice of a succeeding generation. Even choice of a fitting subject has difficulties. One related to the work of the Court on which he and I both have served might seem appropriate. But Judge Cardozo's most significant contributions to the law are not to be found in the reports of the Supreme Court. He was preeminently a devotee of the common law, while the Supreme Court has never been distinguished as a source of common law and during his time renounced independence of judgment as to what the common law is or should be in the class of cases that most often invoked it.(n2) Its preoccupation with constitutional law and statutory construction caused him some discontent which was not always concealed. He once said to me, "If you have a chance to go on the New York Court of Appeals, by all means do so. It is a great common law court, its problems are lawyers' problems. But the Supreme Court is occupied chiefly with statutory construction-which no man can make interesting-and with politics." Politics, I hasten to say, was used in the sense of policy, not of partisanship, and had no derogatory implications.

Jamestown High School Dedication

On Friday evening, November 15, 1935, Robert Jackson spoke at the dedication of the newly-constructed Jamestown High School building. His speech is contained in his papers in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., Box 32.

The Supreme Court in the American System of Government

From the Foreword (written by E. Barrett Prettyman, Jr. & William Eldred Jackson) In March 1954 the Harvard Graduate School of Public Administration invited Mr. Justice Jackson to become the Godkin Lecturer for the academic year 1954-1955. The Justice accepted and chose as his topic for the three lectures, "The Supreme Court in the American System of Government." February of 1955 was tentatively set as the date for delivery. The Justice began outlining his subject and formulating his ideas soon after he accepted the invitation, and by the end of summer, 1954, he had completed six drafts of the first lecture and two of the second and third. He then reorganized the whole and wrote one more draft of the first two lectures and two partial redrafts of the third. Mr. Justice Jackson died suddenly on October 9, 1954. The Justice had intended to write several more drafts before February. Nevertheless, in view of the substantially completed form of the work, the decision was made to publish what he had already written. Except for technical corrections which the Justice himself would have made before delivery, the lectures remain in the form of the latest drafts to come from his hand. The Godkin Lectures on the Essentials of Free Government and the Duties of the Citizen were established at Harvard University in memory of Edwin Lawrence Godkin (1831-1902).

Address to the Daughters of the American Revolution

It is interesting to see so many uncompromising conservatives assembled in memory of a revolution and to see many who a year ago almost shuddered at the thought of a mere change of administration gathered here to commemorate the birth of Washington, who overthrew the established government by bloodshed to give the American of his day a "New Deal". It is one of those strange traits of human nature that very often those strongest for ancestral revolts are strongest against present ones, those more ardent for the first revolution are most cold to the latest one.

Address to Swedish Chamber of Commerce of the United States

It would be an unwarranted presumption for me, after a few weeks'visit in Sweden, to attempt to tell you, who know the country much better than I, about conditions there. It cannot be presumptuous, however, to tell you how those things impressed me. I began with a fair knowledge of the Swedish