A Presidential Legal Opinion

Justice Jackson's essay, A Presidential Legal Opinion, reveals for the first time President Franklin Roosevelt's personal opinions, in FDR's own words, regarding the constitutionality of articles of the Lend Lease Act.

Trial Practice in Accident Litigation

Of the many criticisms which the lay world aims at the legal profession, the most justifiable is that great uncertainty exists both in the law which we apply and in the results which attend our procedure. None may deny that charge; we can differ only as to how much of the uncertainty is inherent and unavoidable and how much we contribute by our philosophy and practice.

Address before the New York State Bar Association

The legal profession may justly claim much credit for the making of our government. American Democracy may justly claim a large part in making the prestige of the legal profession. No other people have submitted so generally to lawyer leadership. We have held all of the judicial and many of the legislative and executive offices.

Maryland at the Supreme Court Bar

So I shall ask you to bear with us while we indulge our lawyerly trait of discussing law suits. We shall prefer to discuss our own rather than to discuss those which some other men may have tried. In studying constitutional issues in the Supreme Court I became vaguely aware that Maryland has been one of the most frequent of its litigants and had participated in some of the most significant cases which have shaped our constitutional doctrine. I have taken this occasion to review the Supreme Court annals to see how well, by its record in litigation, Maryland has vindicated its designation as "The Free State".

A Tribute to Robert H. Jackson by his Nephew

In the courtroom or out of it, Robert Jackson was a remarkable man. This judgment, however, is not entirely objective since he was my uncle. From an early age, he was his own man. Although his father insisted that he become a doctor, he was determined instead to become a lawyer. When his father refused financial assistance, young Robert borrowed money from his uncle and headed for Albany Law School where he completed the course in a single year.

An Organized American Bar

Critical re-examination of the structure of the American Bar Association is a manifestation of the bar's anxiety for its collective welfare. The same sense of insecurity as to the profession's future has initiated in every state movements to strengthen bar associations either by incorporation or by federation of existing voluntary bodies. Bar association speeches drop the old tone of self approval and take on a tone of apprehension and uneasiness.

The Struggle Against Monopoly

Few items of unfinished business present a challenge to this country so insistent as the settlement of an attitude toward the increasing concentration of business control. After 47 years of experience with the Sherman Antitrust Act, the Clayton Act, the Federal Trade Commission Act, the National Recovery Act and the Robinson-Patman Act, Senator Wagner commented that this experience has produced no coherent system of industrial control, and said: "Half of the laws enacted by Congress represent one school of thought, the other half the other. No one can state authoritatively what our national policy is."

Problem of the Administrative Process

There has been one disappointment in connection with my coming here. I had hoped that I would be able to bring with me and deliver the commission to Ryan Duffy as judge of the district court of the United States. (Applause) It would have been a great pleasure had the senate moved fast enough so that that could have been done. Those are minor disappointments, for I know the commission will arrive by mail in due time, and that while I will be denied the satisfaction of being present when he takes the oath, many of the rest of you will have that pleasure.