Robert H. Jackson Takes Oath as Solicitor General

Photograph of Jackson taking the oath and officially becoming U.S. Solicitor General. Robert Jackson succeeded Stanley Reed. Left to right: Attorney General Homer S. Cummings, Solicitor General Robert Jackson, Ugo Carusi (Executive Assistant to the Attorney General).

Jackson Named Associate Justice of the Supreme Court

Jackson Named Associate Justice of Supreme Court. President Roosevelt today elevated Harlan Fiske Stone to be Chief Justice of the United States. At the same time President Roosevelt nominated Sen. James F. Byrnes (D.) of South Carolina and Attorney General Robert H. Jackson to fill the two vacancies on the high court

Associate Justice Robert H. Jackson

Associated Press Photo from New York (Editors: This picture of Associate Justice Robert H. Jackson is for release to afternoon papers Monday, October 6.) Associate Justice Robert H. Jackson, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, wears his official robes at the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Jackson was elevated to this new position from that of Attorney General by President Roosevelt during the summer interim between court sessions.

Senate Committee Considers Jackson Nomination to Office of U.S. Solicitor General

  Senate Committee Considers Jackson Nomination Washington D.C. - A Senate Judiciary sub-comittee considering the nomination of Robert H. Jackson to be Solicitor General of the United States opened hearings her today. Photo shows left to right: Mr. Jackson; Senator George McGill, chairman; Attorney General Homer S

Connery, Jackson, and Black Discuss Wage and Labor Bill, Washington D.C., 1937

Photograph From Wide World Photos, Washington Bureau: Joint Committee Opens Hearings on Wage-Hour Bill. Washington, D.C. -- The Senate and House Labor Committees today opened a joint hearing on the administration's new wage and hour bill. Photo shows the first witness, Assistant Attorney General Robert H. Jackson, discussion the bill with two chairmen. Left to right: Representative William P

Fritz Sauckel, IMT, Nuremberg Germany, 1945-1946

A serious Fritz Sauckel, head of the forced labor program, listens for a translation over IBM headphones. Ernst Friedrich Christoph "Fritz" Sauckel (27 October 1894 – 16 October 1946) was a German Nazi politician, Gauleiter of Thuringia and the General Plenipotentiary for Labour Deployment from 1942 until the end of the Second World War. Sauckel was among the 24 persons accused in Trial of the Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. He was found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, and was sentenced to death by hanging.

Devastation of Nuremberg

A young woman walks down a path cleared between the ruins of fallen buildings in Nuremberg. Nuremberg was severely damaged in Allied strategic bombing from 1943-45. On January 2, 1945, Nuremberg was systematically bombed by the Royal Air Force and the U.S. Army Air Forces and about ninety percent of it was destroyed in only one hour, with 1,800 residents killed and roughly 100,000 displaced. In February 1945, additional attacks followed. In total, about 6,000 Nuremberg residents are estimated to have been killed in air raids

Tight Rope Walkers, Nuremberg Germany, 1945-1946

Tight Rope walkers perform for a crowd of people in front of the city ruins. Nuremberg was severely damaged in Allied strategic bombing from 1943-45. On January 2, 1945, Nuremberg was systematically bombed by the Royal Air Force and the U.S. Army Air Forces and about ninety percent of it was destroyed in only one hour, with 1,800 residents killed and roughly 100,000 displaced. In February 1945, additional attacks followed. In total, about 6,000 Nuremberg residents are estimated to have been killed in air raids

Cathedral In Ruins, Nuremberg Germany, 1945-1946

A family stands among the ruins Nuremberg, where only a portion of the Cathedral remains. Nuremberg was severely damaged in Allied strategic bombing from 1943-45. On January 2, 1945, Nuremberg was systematically bombed by the Royal Air Force and the U.S. Army Air Forces and about ninety percent of it was destroyed in only one hour, with 1,800 residents killed and roughly 100,000 displaced. In February 1945, additional attacks followed. In total, about 6,000 Nuremberg residents are estimated to have been killed in air raids

Nuremberg with River and Ruins, 1945-1946

Nuremberg was severely damaged in Allied strategic bombing from 1943-45. On January 2, 1945, Nuremberg was systematically bombed by the Royal Air Force and the U.S. Army Air Forces and about ninety percent of it was destroyed in only one hour, with 1,800 residents killed and roughly 100,000 displaced. In February 1945, additional attacks followed. In total, about 6,000 Nuremberg residents are estimated to have been killed in air raids